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Annual chamber luncheon puts the focus on Pottstown

LOWER POTTSGROVE — The TriCounty Area Chamber of Commerce and Pottstown Area Economic Development (PAED) recently hosted the annual Pottstown Progress Luncheon.

As part of the event, held Feb. 14 at the Sunnybrook Ballroom, two special awards were presented to individuals for their dedication to Pottstown.

State Rep. Joe Ciresi, D-146 Dist. was recognized as the recipient of PAED’s second annual Connector Award, presented by Peggy Lee-Clark, executive director of PAED. Lee-Clark cited Ciresi’s commitment to Pottstown, telling the nearly 200 attendees that he continues to “jump in to help and is always looking for the right development for Pottstown.”

In his acceptance of the award, Ciresi said it wasn’t about him, but about “all of those who work in the trenches,” according to a press release about the event.

“Pottstown is Main Street, USA. Let’s make the investment in it and bring back this jewel of a town,” he said.

A second award — the inaugural PAED Board of Directors Award was presented to Thomas Hylton. He was recognized for having written 15 articles about PAED’s history and the difference PAED’s work has made in Pottstown. Hylton was also given a citation from the Pennsylvania Senate, presented by state Sen. Tracy Pennycuick, R-24th Dist.

Keynote speaker, Eric T. Goldstein, president and CEO of the King of Prussia District addresses attendees at the Feb. 14 TriCounty Area Chamber of Commerce Pottstown Progress Luncheon. (Photo Courtesy TriCounty Area Chamber)
Keynote speaker, Eric T. Goldstein, president and CEO of the King of Prussia District addresses attendees at the Feb. 14 TriCounty Area Chamber of Commerce Pottstown Progress Luncheon. (Photo Courtesy TriCounty Area Chamber)

The keynote speaker for the event was Eric T. Goldstein, president and CEO of the King of Prussia District — a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) business improvement district founded in 2010. The King of Prussia District serves as a catalyst for economic development and job growth. It serves 431 commercial, industrial and multi-family property owners within its 1,935-acre boundary, according to its website.

In his remarks, Goldstein spoke about the difference key projects can make in communities. He shared three key elements he suggests should be in place when communities consider a business improvement district like his organization: Solidifying the belief among property owners that a rising tide floats all boats; ensuring adequate program and staff funding to eliminate disappointment; and hiring highly competent and aggressive staff who understand the power of getting things done quickly with stakeholder funds, according to the release.

Montgomery County Commissioners from left to right: Thomas DiBello; Neil Makhija, vice chairman; and Jamila Winder, chairwoman at the Feb. 14 Pottstown Progress luncheon.(Photo Courtesy TriCounty Area Chamber)
Montgomery County Commissioners from left to right: Thomas DiBello; Neil Makhija, vice chairman; and Jamila Winder, chairwoman at the Feb. 14 Pottstown Progress luncheon. (Photo Courtesy TriCounty Area Chamber)

Attendees also heard from the three Montgomery County Commissioners Jamila Winder, chairwoman; Neil Makhija, vice chairman; and Thomas DiBello.

 


Source: Berkshire mont

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