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Daniel Boone High School celebrates graduation of 258 seniors

Matthew Ferenz, class secretary, told the 258 graduates not to forget the memories and dreams made at Daniel Boone Area High School as the class of 2024 celebrated its graduation on June 6.

“What a journey this has been,” Ferenz said in his welcome remarks. “The amount of effort that each and every one of us has put into getting to this moment is absolutely incredible. Today is a special moment in our lives as it closes this chapter and begins a new one.”

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Hannah Huddleson, class treasurer, said it took roughly 2,340 days of school to get to this monumental moment, the last memory they will have of high school.

“For the past 13 years, we have been dreaming for this day to come. For some, the path wasn’t always easy,” she said. “Everyone here has faced challenges and obstacles to get themselves to this stage.”

All of the dedication since kindergarten has not gone unnoticed, she said.

“You have worked tirelessly to arrive at this moment, so please celebrate your achievement,” said Huddleson.

The class of 2024 walked through the halls of Daniel Boone High School one last time on their way to commencement. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)
The class of 2024 walked through the halls of Daniel Boone High School one last time on their way to commencement. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)

She told the graduates to put themselves out there and never be afraid to show who they are, learn and challenge themselves daily, and know they can do anything they put their minds to.

“Every single one of you sitting in front of me today are world changers,” said Huddleson.

She thanked her class for teaching her the true meaning of inclusion, acceptance and understanding.

Marin Krause, third honors, said she waited a long time for this day to celebrate all that they have worked for and all that they have become, but she was saddened, too, by its quick arrival, knowing it means leaving behind friends she loves and teachers who inspired her.

She hopes the graduates are proud of themselves and plan on achieving the future they deserve.

“You have everything you need to make a difference in the world,” Krause said.

Daniel Boone salutatorian Evan Goudie said that to experience real fulfilling change in your life, you have to push yourself out of your comfort zone. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)
Daniel Boone salutatorian Evan Goudie said that to experience real fulfilling change in your life, you have to push yourself out of your comfort zone. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)

Salutatorian Evan Goudie said that to experience real fulfilling change in your life, you have to push yourself out of your comfort zone.

“Complacency has killed more dreams than doubt or fear ever have. You should never be afraid to be wrong or make mistakes. If anything, humility is one of the most freeing attributes you will ever experience.”

His advice is to make small changes from day to day that will later multiply.

“It is okay not to know exactly where you want to go in life, but it is not okay to ignore the question entirely.”

Valedictorian Landon Herzog set the goal to become valedictorian and president of the National Honor Society, aimed to get the school’s Academic Challenge team to states and earn Eagle Scout rank, all achievements he credits to following a two-step process.

First, set a goal that provides direction for a path to success. Second, step is to work hard to achieve your goal.

“Great leaders in our history such as George Washington, Teddy Roosevelt and Martin Luther King Jr. would have been nothing had they not put in the hard work to achieve their goals.”

While this may seem difficult, he said with a little persistence and determination you will surely meet your goals.

“If you are passionate about your goals, I can guarantee that you will put in the work to achieve success,” he said.

Herzog knows that if they follow his two-step process, the class of 2024 will achieve great things in the future.

“If you put your mind to it and put in the work, anything could be possible.”

Senior class president Robert Fitzpatrick led the Daniel Boone graduates in the symbolic tassel change in recognition of receiving their diplomas. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)
Senior class president Robert Fitzpatrick led the Daniel Boone graduates in the symbolic tassel change in recognition of receiving their diplomas. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)

Class president Robert Fitzpatrick led the graduates in the symbolic tassel change in recognition of earning their diplomas.

“While I know some of you are raring to grab that diploma and book it out to the parking lot, I encourage you to enjoy this moment,” he said.

Fitzpatrick said the last four years flew by in the blink of an eye, filled with countless memories, both good and bad. They shared laughter, stress, success and failures, and they have grown in knowledge and character.

“Just as much as this is an end, it’s also a beginning for something new. Life is full of chapters and this is just the conclusion of one and the exciting start of another,” said Fitzpatrick.

Citing his 77-some-year-old neighbor who still jogs every morning as an example, Fitzpatrick said it is never too late to try something new or to push your limits.

In his final words to the class of 2024, Fitzpatrick said: “Cherish the memories we’ve made, look forward to the future with hope and excitement and never stop striving to be the best versions of yourselves.”

Evan Miller, senior class vice president, provided the closing remarks for Daniel Boone commencement. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)
Evan Miller, senior class vice president, provided the closing remarks for Daniel Boone commencement. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)

In the closing remarks, Evan Miller, class vice president, said we exist to love — to love one another, to love nature, to love the beauty of this world.

“Love is the only thing that can transcend barriers of age, gender, nationality, disabilities or any setback we face in life. Love is a universal language,” said Miller.

While tangible things don’t hold meaning in the long run, loving and caring for people is the most important thing you can do. Establishing connections and growing closer to people you love is the most meaningful thing you can do with your time, he said.

“When you take your last breath, things you will remember and appreciate most are those meaningful connections you have built over your entire existence. Most importantly, love yourself,” said Miller.

Daniel Boone grads congratulate one another at the conclusion of commencement. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)
Daniel Boone grads congratulate one another at the conclusion of commencement. (Photo courtesy of Matt Messina, Lifetouch)

Thomas Voelker said in a statement that in his first year as Daniel Boone’s superintendent, this senior class has truly been special.

“Not only is this class comprised of incredibly intelligent, talented and gifted individuals, but they are some of the most incredibly kind, generous and inclusive group of students I have ever had the pleasure of working with,” Voelker said. “They are undoubtedly going to have a positive impact on our world!”

Voelker said this class leaves behind a legacy of perseverance, inclusion and community spirit. Their achievements set a high standard for future students.

“As our graduates step into the future, we encourage them to continue pursuing their dreams with determination and passion,” he said. “The world needs their talents, creativity, kindness and leadership now more than ever.”


Source: Berkshire mont

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