Press "Enter" to skip to content

Primary 2022: The contest for the GOP nod in 24th Senatorial District

Republican voters in the 24th Senatorial District will have a choice when they head to the polls.

Washington Township Supervisor David Moyer and state Rep. Tracy Pennycuick are seeking the nomination in the May 17 primary. The winner will go on to face the candidate who emerges with the Democratic nomination in the general election.

The post has long been held by Bob Mensch, who announced this year that he would not be seeking reelection. The district includes parts of eastern Berks County and northwest Montgomery County.

State senators serve a four-year term and receive an annual salary of $95,432.

We asked the candidates to respond to four questions:

David Moyer

David Moyer

Residence: Washington Township.

Age: 58.

Background: Moyer has served as a Washington Township supervisor for the past 10 years. He is a heavy equipment operator for a pipeline company.

Website: davidmoyerforpasenate24.com

Why are you the best person for this position?

I believe my experience as a local elected township official has given me the knowledge I need to work in this position as a state senator. As a member of the Pennsylvania State Association of Township Supervisors, I have also gained experience in making resolutions that have the potential to become law. My experience also includes working with state officials, PennDOT, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. I have experience in being fiscally responsibility while running a balanced budget. I also understand the need of the local people and take full responsibility in spending their hard-earned tax dollars appropriately.

What do you think is the single biggest problem currently facing Pennsylvanians and what would you do to address that problem?

The biggest problem Pennsylvania residents are facing today is the high taxes including but not limited to gas, income and property taxes. As a state senator, I would review and reevaluate the social programs with my colleagues and eliminate wasteful spending.

More than a dozen public opinion surveys found that about two-thirds of Republicans continue to hold the view that the results of the 2020 presidential election were skewed by voter fraud. What would you do to restore voter confidence in the system?

I would assure election integrity will be restored by one-day-only voting. Mail-in ballots would only be used for people with disabilities, people who are out of state or country during election time, and also to active-duty military. I would ensure that all ballot machines cannot be hacked and that all ballots will be counted within hours of polls closing. Voter ID and paper ballots would be considered.

When the Supreme Court hands down its decision in an abortion case this summer, the power to regulate abortion would likely rest in the hands of states. Would you support a full or partial ban on abortion in Pennsylvania (if partial, at what point in a pregnancy would you ban them) and what, if any, exceptions to that ban would you support?

I would support full abortion ban in Pennsylvania. I am 100% pro-life from the start of conception to birth.

Tracy Pennycuick

State Rep. Tracy Pennycuick

Residence: Lower Salford Township, Montgomery County.

Age: 56.

Background: Pennycuick has served as a state representative since 2021. Before running for office, she served in the Army for more than 25 years, owned a small business in the aviation services industry and was chosen to lead the Montgomery County Veterans Affairs Office for three years. She has a business degree from the University of Missouri.

Website: tracypennycuick.com

Why are you the best person for this position?

We need proven experience and leadership in Harrisburg. I’ve been fighting to protect our constitution and way of life my entire career whether by serving my country on the battlefield as a U.S. Army combat veteran or in Harrisburg as a state representative. My colleagues and I fought against Gov. Wolf’s reckless mandates, passed a constitutional amendment to limit his power, held the line on taxes and worked to limit the expansion of government. My district office and I provide excellent, locally focused constituent services on a daily basis, and I’ve always had an open door to everyone. I’m proud of my record and look forward to continuing my service as state senator. I have also been endorsed by the Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation and Gun Owners of America.

What do you think is the single biggest problem currently facing Pennsylvanians and what would you do to address that problem?

Without a doubt, the biggest problem facing Pennsylvanians is historic inflation, gas prices and home energy prices. In this time of economic uncertainty, our government needs to provide predictable, consistent and conservative fiscal policy. We must hold the line on taxes and work to reduce mandates and regulations. Recently, the state Senate voted to override the governor’s implementation of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. The independent fiscal office estimates that residents, as a result of these regulations, will face upwards of an $800 million, up to a 30% increase in home energy bills. While I support efforts to make clean energy efficient, available and affordable, the technology isn’t ready, and this initiative only serves to hurt residents at a time when their bills are already sky high. The override vote failed by one vote. That’s how important every race for state Senate is this year.

More than a dozen public opinion surveys found that about two-thirds of Republicans continue to hold the view that the results of the 2020 presidential election were skewed by voter fraud. What would you do to restore voter confidence in the system?

It is extremely important that all citizens have confidence in our electoral system. To start, our current election laws must be applied consistently throughout every county in Pennsylvania. The governor and Department of State should be issuing guidance that follows the law only. Election Day is one day in the primary and one day in the general, and except for overseas and military ballots, we must only accept votes cast in person or by mail domestically that are received by 8 p.m. on Election Day. The unconstitutional expansion of Act 77 must stop immediately.

When the Supreme Court hands down its decision in an abortion case this summer, the power to regulate abortion would likely rest in the hands of states. Would you support a full or partial ban on abortion in Pennsylvania (if partial, at what point in a pregnancy would you ban them) and what, if any, exceptions to that ban would you support?

I’m pro-life.


Source: Berkshire mont

Be First to Comment

    Leave a Reply

    %d bloggers like this: